Jun 10, 2009

A quickie birkat?

Any legitimacy or kosherness to this? Found on Jewish Virtual Library.


"Since it was felt that the full Grace after meals was a bit too long, many prayer books have a shortened form alongside the full text, One of them is quoted in O.H. 192 in B.H. 1, and it contains all the essential elements required by the Talmud. The shortened Grace may be used when brevity is desired. The United Synagogue has adopted one, with additions in English, for general use in Conservative synagogues.
Alternative Grace after Meals

B'rich rahamana malka d'alma mareih d'hahy pita."

8 comments:

shavuatov said...

Are you asking if it is ok from an Orthodox perspective to use this shortened version?

If so, I'm afraid I can't assist - but I'm sure someone else will come along with an opinion.... :)

rachel

Chaviva said...

Yup! From an Orthodox perspective. I'm guessing the answer is "no" or "only as last resort" but we'll see :)

Tuvia said...

It might be nice to have the option sometimes when we are in a rush. Pretty interesting how much is actually Hallacha and how much is adopted practice.

Dunking Rachel said...

this is like the one I use after a luch break at work.... granted I'm of the conservative stream...

What is actual Hallacha and what is tradition is a discussion that I have experienced to open up that big ol' can of worms.....well maybe not worms....don't think they are kosher....lol....

Daniel Saunders said...

There is a shorter form of bentsching in Orthodox siddurim, but it is only to be used in emergencies. Also, it is significantly longer than that Conservative one (about a page long).

Interesting that the Conservative shorter bentsching you quoted seems to be in Aramaic rather than Hebrew.

B. Spinoza said...

my personal favorite is "rub a dub dub, thanks for the grub" :)

Trip'n Mommy said...

I have heard of this, but don't know its Halachic standing.

I know some Orthodox people teach this to their children to say after a meal, if the kids are too young to say full(or even parts of)Birkat HaMazon.

David S, UK said...

The mitzva from the torah requires separate brachot mentioning 1) food, the sustainance of mankind, 2) the land of Israel, and 3) Jerusalem. These first three paragraphs until "boneh yerushalayim" are the original core. An additional bracha "hatov vehameitiv" ("the one who is good and does good")was added by the rabis; and the rest is minhag.

So I can't see this alternative being sufficient -- the shorter form of grace ("in emergencies only") in my (orthodox) siddur has summaries of the three "torah" brachot and the "rabbinic" one.

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